Big transition, good tools

This blog started out as a personal space to post thoughts on wine and food…. And then I left my place of employment for the last decade to work as an independent consultant, and all of a sudden, having a (free) personal website / blog is much more important now.

I’m also taking on the task of managing the technology for a small(ish) K-8 independent school, and since I’m making this transition right before the school year begins, there’s a lot going on – right away, all the time, all high priority.

The main asset I have in jumping into the deep end like this is a friend of mine who I have dragged in for a brief period to handle the high-level (and low level) tech infrastructure stuff at the school. This gives me some breathing room to think about what’s next, what’s needed, and how to proceed.

So the first thing I did was set up a wiki, so that I can just dump ideas and needs into a long brainstorm list. I’ve set up a remote wiki using WikiSpaces, so both me and my tech expert can look at it remotely. I’ve already gone from a list of 20+ items to a sorted list of to-dos, immediate and long-term projects – identified by who’s responsible. In an afternoon, after taking notes for two days.

In additon, I’ve added links to the web pages we’ll need access to on a regular basis – webmail, portal login pages, etc. (And no, I haven’t posted passwords, and yes, it’s a private wiki). Once I’ve got a bit of a handle on the info and sorted the wiki pages a bit more, I can just send a link out to the staff saying “Here’s what you need to know about the tech support and management right now.”

Not to mention that I’ll plug in a Del.icio.us feed of links I think relevant. And maybe even a blog feed from here of items tagged “technology” or something relevant.

Or not. People may hate the wiki. But it saved me from having to save 5 pages of notes on my desktop, then email to folks – and where does the info get consolidated?

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